Tag Archives: Global Women

Reflections: Spark’s Philanthropic Mentorship Series Launch

Reflections by Spark Member, David Scatterday

It was a distinct pleasure to participate in the inaugural installment of Spark’s Philanthropic Mentorship Series. Worthy of a truly notable launch, we were joined by philanthropic innovators Yann Borgstedt and Antonela Notari Vischer from the Womanity Foundation.

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Auspiciously, everything about the launch event of such a promising series was seamless.

First, a little about our guests: Womanity is an entrepreneurial foundation that thinks creatively to find solutions to today’s women’s empowerment challenges. Key topical areas of action include giving women and girls a voice, advancing education and opportunities, providing fellowships to emerging female social entrepreneurs.  As a man, Womanity’s founder Yann Borgstedt does not fit the traditional model of a woman’s empowerment pioneer. However, Yann understands that solving for women’s issues is a key part of solving every development issue around the globe.

Back to our scene: we were hosted in the headquarters of the Cordes Foundation, whose work is focused on alleviating global poverty and empowering women and girls to fully participate in the development of their communities.

In my mind, the event crystallized everything that is so great about Spark.

First, reinforcing its mission of empowering tomorrow’s philanthropic leaders, the event was custom-designed to engage millennials in real dialogue with real practitioners. Speaking with leading social entrepreneurs in the field triggered valuable dialogue about real solutions to pain points encountered by the aspiring millennial philanthropists and activists in the room.

Second, the event was infused by a deep sense of shared mission. While Spark and Womanity take relatively different approaches to programming and fundraising for women’s issues – it was very evident the two organizations share a deeply held common cause of empowering women around the world. This shared sense of mission added a tangible sense of relevance and urgency to the entire session’s dialogue.

Finally, over several years of involvement with Spark, I’ve realized that solving for women’s issues requires an ‘all-hands’ approach. In our increasingly globalized and resource-constrained world, every pressing social issue is a woman’s issue. Whether climate change, health care access or hunger, women are disproportionately impacted. Bringing about real change will require large-scale collective action – women and men working together to solve truly global problems.  Both Womanity and Spark are organizations that understand this and practice a large-tent approach to addressing social problems every day.

Last week’s mentorship session made me prouder than ever to be an active male, millennial philanthropist and Spark member, confirming that I, and everyone at Spark, are taking the right steps to meaningfully improve the welfare of women in this generation – and the next.

Water Empowering Women

Uganda Women's Water Initiative

Post Authored By: Spark Fellow, Linn Hellerstrom

In the district of Gomba in Uganda, access to water is a human rights crisis. Only 58% of residents have access to toilets. Securing clean drinking water is a daily struggle. 50 children, under the age of five die every month as a result of this problematic issue. The Uganda Women’s Water Initiative (UWWI) is standing in front of a big challenge. Spark is honored to partner with these brave women to reverse this crisis.

Mukasa Hajra founded UWWI in 2012. She was inspired by the success of an international NGOs progress in the region. The Global Women’s Water Initiative’s work with “WASH” services (water, sanitation and health) compelled Mukasa to start her own health collaborative. WASH provides women with knowledge and tools to address water sanitation in their own communities. Mukasa wanted to expand their work in Gomba. Thus, UWWI was created.

UWWI provides solutions for water and sanitation problems using locally available materials and technologies. Theirs is a sustainable solution for their women participants and the communities they serve. Not only are they helping villages access clean drinking water, UWWI is also a way for women to earn a living. Training is given in engineering sanitation technologies, as well as the making of brickets and kitchen gardens. The women are then able to trade the goods and services on a market and enabling greater financial independence.

A big part of what makes UWWI such an impressive organization is their scale of impact. Since last year, over 35,000 people have benefited from UWWI’s education and clean water campaigns. Their mission is to more then double their outreach by 2015.

With a grant from Spark, UWWI will work to increase the amount of safe drinking water through the construction of bio-sand filters and water tanks and toilets. We are excited to follow this work and development of Uganda Women’s Water Initiative’s over the coming year.